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have a deficit. here's a project that gets substantial tax revenue without raising taxes through economic activity, through job creation. further and perhaps most importantly, it will help put our country within striking range of a long-sought goal -- true energy security. for the first time in generations, the united states with its friend and ally canada will have the capacity to produce more energy than we use, reducing or eliminating our reliance on the middle east and other volatile parts of the world. the argument has been advanced that the oil sands will increase carbon emissions and that failing to build the keystone x.l. will somehow reduce emissions. but let's look at that claim. that's the other piece. let's look at the environmental aspects of this project. today, more than 80% of all new recovery in the oil sands is being accomplished in situ, a technology that makes oil sands carbon footprint comparable to conventional drilling. in fact, the oil sands industry has reduced greenhouse gas emissions per barrel of oil produced by an average of 26% since 1990, with some
life work for more families. another step we can take is on taxes. there's a lot of talk about taxes in washington right now. for most families, tax preparation is hard and is time-consuming. this time of year especially. think about it. think what they're going through. what tax form are you supposed to fill out? is it more beneficial to file jointly or as a married couple or separately? is a truck or gas mileage deductible? are you forgetting something the irs will give you credit for? and in 1935, the form 1040 was accompanied by a two-page instruction booklet. today, taxpayers have to wade through over 100 total pages of instructions. just filling out a w4 at a knew job is confusing. you really shouldn't need a work sheet to see how many dependents you have. chairman dave camp and his committee are already underway in their efforts to responsibly rewrite the nation's tax laws, as an education policy, health care and all else, tax reform should reflect the priority of working families, and the future they're trying to shape for their kids. if nothing else, we must stop putting spe
direction to help make life work for families. another step we can take is on taxes. there's a lot of talk about taxes in washington right now. for most families, tax preparation is hard and it is time-consuming. this time of year especially. think about it, think what they're going through. what tax from are you supposed to fill out, is a more beneficial to file jointly or as a married couple or separately? is a truck or gas mileage deductible or are you forgetting something that the irs gives credit for? in 1935, the form 1040 was a concrete but a to instruction booklet. today, taxpayers have got to wade through over 100 total pages of instructions. just filling out at w-4 at a new job is confusing. you really shouldn't need a worksheet to see how many dependents you have. chairman dave camp and his committee are already underway in their effort to responsibly rewrite the nation's tax law. as in education policy, health care and all else, tax reform should reflect the priority of working families, and the future their time to shape for the kids. if nothing else, we must stop putting spec
. italy -- why small businesses are protesting against tax collectors. and luxembourg -- why illegal immigrants there want to get registered. children are typically raised by tibia will parents, but does it matter if they are a mother and father, or can two fathers or two mothers do just as well -- children are typically raised by two parents. single-sex families are a controversial issue in europe. the number of so-called rainbow families are on the rise, but their legal status varies from country to country. in germany, gay and lesbian couples cannot jointly adopt a child or a baby. they can only adopt as individuals. in france, when the government announced its intention to give homosexual couples equal adoption rights, large crowds took to the streets in protest. >> for these two little boys, having two mothers is nothing unusual. their parents are a lesbian couple. beatrice, seen here, adopted the boys as a single woman. her partner had no legal say in it, and by french law, singles may adopt, but same-sex couples may not. an initiative is under way to change that. for these two
karzai and david cameron had a meeting to spend a six-month deadline on tax of the taliban. two ambition i pakistan was a political party functioning in society? and two, to think the footprint strategy is fun for the united states in afghanistan long-term? >> the first one is to speak to in terms of where they see the taliban up but i love all an integrated in the mainstream of society. they do have constitutional obligations they seem to uphold that we are also looking with the united states transitions and if ken estanislao. there is a timeline as well in an election to be held in afghanistan. so these are processes and political decisions they must make themselves. and when i say this, i do want to point to the historic ship that pakistan is proactively making. our government has been clear, including all of our stakeholders, which includes the military that pakistan is going to strenuously support all efforts of stabilizing afghanistan and bringing peace to the region because that is the know our vital interests. we live right they are and it's stable and peaceful afghanistan is in
'm stewart in for neil cavuto. remember this, that fiscal cliff deal, huge amount in tax hikes. not much in the way of spending cuts. are we about to see the sequel? the president is calling on congress to pass another quick fix to avert those automatic spending cuts he originally signed off on, kicking in march 1 income, and this includes new tax revenues. the former south carolina senator jim demint says we have seen how the movie ins and it's not go. okay, jim, spell it out. more tacks and not so many spending cuts. what's the result? >> you have to scratch your head. the federal government will receive historically high tax revenues this year, yet we've double spending. it's a spending problem. the president is not willing to cut spending at this point. he continues to talk about more taxes. even though he promised that this sequester would never happen and if he got his tax increases he would cut spending. >> what are the run republics going to do? we have the president calling for more taxes. what should their response be? >> well, republicans passed in the house last year what the
. the president and senator reid old want more revenue beating one way or another, more taxes. and yes, the dow is turning away from backing off from 14,000. here we go, everyone. "varney & co." is about to begin. [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all onhinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ from td ameritrade. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. stuart: we are going to call this a news alert. senator harry reid calling for more tax increases. in an interview on abc yesterday, he said tax revenue must be part of any deal to be part of the little defense cuts. here is senator reid. >> the american people are on our side, and america p
, larry, and you can't tax an economy in the prosperity period. >> look, ideally you would say okay, we're going to freeze government spending at this level and that would mean over time it is going to fall as a percentage of the economy, but you can't ever get congress to do that, right? so it always ends up being something very harsh to get things done. and so this is the consequence that you have to face. at least in the short term. that you're going to have a short-term hit to gdp. but in the long run, the numbers are going to be better for the united states. >> most of that stuff is transfer payments. >> agreed. >> it will not even affect gdp. defense purchases do affect gdp. but to america since nobody ever wants to cut spending -- >> you got to cut somewhere. >> and i would do it right now. >> and it will only happen during bad times, larry. it will never happen during good times. we see that over and over again, when the economy is going gang busters, the government just chooses to spend more. it's in its nature. you have to do it when it's tough. >> lower spending means a stron
tax rates anyway by nearly 25%. what it triggered was falling inflation, falling interest rates and the strongest economic expansion in 30 years. [ male announcer ] i've seen incredible things. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ no they don't. hey son. have fun tonight. ♪ ♪ back against the wall ♪ ain't nothin to me ♪ ain't nothin to me [ crowd murmurs ] hey! ♪ [ howls ] ♪ >>> global stock market still on a tear. did you know almost 20 world indexes traded at new multi year highs this year already? did you know japan, the hottest of the hot up 3.8% just today? cnbc's seema mody joins us. >> we have seen a revival in global equities. better than expected earnings. easy money from the fed and decent economic data brought fresh money to equitieequities. the s&p 500 and nasdaq trade at new highs. the ral d
in the social security payroll tax, the increase in tax rates on income above certain thresholds and the cuts in federal spending scheduled to take effect next month will mean reduced spending by both consumers and the government. we project inflation adjusted g.d.p. will increase about 1.5% in 2013. but it will increase roughly 1.5% fast if not for the fiscal tightening. after the economy adjusts to that fiscal restraint, we expect the growth in real g.d.p. will pick up to about 3.5% per year in 2014 and the following few years. but the gap between the nation's g.d.p. and what it is capable of producing on a sustainable basis, what we call potential g.d.p., will not close quickly at that rate of growth. under current law, we expect output to remain below its potential level until 2017. almost a decade after the recession started in december of 2007. by our estimates, g.d.p. was more than 5% below its potential level in the fourth quarter of last year. a gap that is only modestly smaller than the gap that existed three years ago. because growth in output since then has been only slightly fast
tax revenues in order to help the deficit. we'll have a conversation with represent dave camp coming up later in the program. stay with us. m charles schwab... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 gives me tools that help me find opportunities more easily. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can even access it from the cloud and trade on any computer. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and with schwab mobile, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can focus on trading anyplace, anytime. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 until i choose to focus on something else. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 all this with no trade minimums. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and only $8.95 a trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 open an account with a $50,000 deposit, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and get 6 months commission-free trades. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5411. more "likes." more tweets. so, beginning today, my son brock and his whole team will be our new senior social media strategists. any questions? since we make radiator valves wouldn't it be better if we just let fedex help us to expand to new markets? hmm gotta admit that's better than a few "likes." i don't have the door code. who's that
gerri willis. tonight on "the willis report." a new federal tax policy. the latest push in congress to make marijuana legal and tax it. president obama proposes a short-term fix to delay automatic spending cuts one day after he blows another budget deadline. and the shocking proof union leaders just want more power, not power to the people. "the willis report" is on the case. all that and more coming up later, but first, the top story tonight, building in washington can change, totally remake current marijuana laws. including legalizing industrial production as well as establishing a federal pot tax. lawmakers on both sides of the aisle worked away on these bills, one of which introduced just today by two democratic congressman. both of them calling for an end to federal pot prohibition. will it work? joining us now, drug policy visor and founder and executive director of the drug policy alliance. starting with you. melissa: it is a lot like the appeal of alcohol probation. if it doesn't work, it is not effective and they say it is costing tens of billions of dollars every year, div
-home pay, because of the expiration of a payroll tax holiday. so will consumers be forced to cut back spending, hurting economic growth, and stock market performance? >> not necessarily, because rising gasoline prices is usually predicated on a weaker dollar or better economic activity. better economic activity would lead to higher earnings. >> reporter: wolfberg says crude prices would have to jump $10 a barrel, or roughly 10%, before there's a major hit to the u.s. economy. erika mille "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: still aad, the federal resee theatest target a cyber attack, areompanies taking cyber risks seriously? >> susie: on wall street today, a choppy day of trading with investors focused on new concerns about the outlook for europe's economy, and a new batch of corporate earnings. with more than half of the companies in the s&p reporting, quarterly results have been better than expected. still, by the closing bell, stocks were virtually unchanged. the dow rose seven points, the nasdaq fell three, and the s&p added nearly a point. >> susie: while the stock market is flirting wit
away from its all-time high and a taxing debate in washington. president obama once again says he's going to seek to get new revenue to help bring down the deficit and specifically, he's now calling out carried interest tax breaks again. we'll see where that goes. plus, the story that everyone is talking about this morning, the ravens holding on to beat the 49ers in the super bowl after the lights went out for 45 minutes at the superdome. we're going to try to keep the lights on. "squawk box" begins right now. ♪ if you like it then you should have put a ring on it ♪ ♪ if you like it then you should have put a ring on it ♪ >> good morning, everybody. i'm becky quick along with andrew ross sorkin. joe kernen is on vacation today so we're joined by steve liesman. we're happy to have him here. our top story this morning, the market. we have assembled a trio of wall street's most respected voices to join us for the next hour. we have a lot to talk about this morning. plus, there is that issue of the lights going out at the super dole last night. officials say an abnormality in
wants more "revenue." >> and looking to expand it. >> republicans would have been blamed for any tax increase on the middle class. >> the end result being he takes more money off of wealthy people. >> it slows us down gradually. >> many can say texas don't matter. of course they will in the long run. stuart: here we come. what a perfect moment to throw it to dagen and connell. connell: good morning, everyone. dagen: america is a good bet. here to tell you why. connell: one of our guests in this hour could be the next energy secretary. dagen: more on the power outage and the record-breaking at cbs sports for that incredible game. connell: and cyber attacks, the white house considering action against china. dagen: i had the ravens, did you? by a field goal, 27-24. connell: nobody knows football like dagen mcdowell. clearly. dagen: stocks now has to do every 15 minutes, nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. nicole: a good bet going. if yo you're betting on the mar, 14,000 mark a little disappointed today, we are pulling back, dow jones industrials down 116 points right now.
$84. they talked about payroll tax increases. it is in a more competitive environment. the easy way for walmart is over. a little bit of a pullback is expected. back to you. melissa: thank you so much. a big month in january. we get to the bottom line with elizabeth macdonald. why is this? >> you have been talking about that great rotation. we have not seen a start like this in 15 years. in the month of january alone. it surpasses what happened all of last year combined for all four quarters. the bears have left the building. the s&p forward earnings that we are looking at are still cheap versus the october 27 peak. the s&p 500 was trading at 13. if it hits 14, then you are talking s&p 1600. if it hits 16, you are talking s&p 1700. are we setting up a classic bear trap? that stock has gotten ahead of the economic recovery. we are seeing the togo war on whether or not we will have a downdraft by end of year. melissa: who is winning? >> though bulls are winning for now. if there is a pullback there, you could be in a downdraft air up. melissa: thank you so much. lori: this has been th
." -- please tax me more." we have gotten so desperate in this area that we are talking about, perhaps because we cannot make a policy decision on this and have not since the early 1990's on the federal level, maybe we need to go to indexing of the fuel tax. >> you are talking like infrastructure, not to pay for subsidies, right? >> what we need is more infrastructure, and that is a public good, and it needs to be paid for, and generally with tax revenues. i do not think anybody is faulting that. i think it is sold that we need higher fuel tax, and we can use that either to reduce the deficit or to pay for something else. it was designed -- or intended -- whether it has done so successfully or not, it was done to pay for infrastructure. >> absolutely. we are not real happy about that. >> john, what are you hoping for next week? >> for some reason, i have not been consulted on that. the president in the campaign said he was 4 and all of the above energy policy, so let's have some announcements that support that -- he was for an " all of the above" energy policy. let's move forward with the thin
as a baseline scenario. remember, all the times the bush tax rates were expected to expire. this is probably the best look. the most honest look we have gone from cbo in years now. i want to show you one more thing on deficit reduction. this is the three scenarios. if you increase deficits by $2 trillion, long-term, by 2023, you start to slow down if you had no deficit reduction. look at how much growth increases here. you take a short-term hit for next year, in the long term, you are adding almost two percentage points to gdp. back to you. lori: that was just about as helpful of a visual as you can get when it comes to understanding this math. melissa: that really breaks it down. what is the cost of reducing the deficit. if only we would have done that before. a great report. thank you. lori: troubling, at best. let's continue on. reversing yesterday's pullback and continuing to rally through the start of this year. will this continue? >> i am pretty optimistic going forward. i do think you will hit about 1675 on the s&p as the year end target. the housing recovery will continue. i think ov
. they are simply willing to spend money. they gave tax cuts and never paid for them. in the end they have eroded the revenue of the government. some of it is coming back. the wars are winding down. the economy is picking up. but there is a real health care problem that we have to deal with at some point. it will take some revenue. you cannot just do it by magically saying that it will fallout of the sky. you cannot cut enough to get the debt down without talking about revenue. i think it they did a little bit here at the end of january 3. everyone gave the office and will not give again. host: this editorial from "usa today," de say that it is not a spending problem -- but "usa spend money. today," others, saying that it is. guest: let me explain. the average cost spent on a senior citizen in medicare is flat. it went up 0.4% last year. it is flat spending. the fact is that beginning in 2011, all the children born after the second world war, the so-called baby boomers, are coming on. when i came to congress in 1989 there were 35 million seniors on medicare. 30 million people altogether. we have
currently have to pay 50% tax, yes, on their appearance and up to 10% of their worldwide earnings following a legal victory. other sporting events, including the dhampon's league final and the olympics have also had amnesty written into their contract. if you ever wonder why your favorite athlete may not be showing up to your favorite british competition, maybe now you have an answer. >> he raced here for the olympics and i don't think he's raced here in the previous three years. >> because look, it's not just a one off winnings related to that event, but all of a sudden your annual earnings are subject to this tax? >> it's an annual appearance fee. >> it's a pretty big incentive for athletes to say, you know what? not worth it. >> we're asking do you think it's fair for athletes to be given special tax breaks? is usain worth it? e-mail us, tweet us. >> is usain bolt worth it? >> do you want to go there? do you think it's -- do you think this event is worth it, by the way, to try to do the anniversary of the olympics to remind people and keep the positive buzz going? >> yeah. it draw tess c
not have to pay the amt. it also changed the estate tax bumping down the rate of little bit lower than what it had been over the exception of little bit higher. the numbers we just show you, the real numbers will be much worse. we will find out at 1:00 o'clock. back to you. dagen: are we going to be in a statement from the white house at 1:15 p.m.? rich: he will talk about the sequester. he will push for congress to pass a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reform to avoid the economically harmful consequences. he wants tax increases and spending cuts. the tax issue is closed, says the republicans. dagen: thank you for that update. for more on the outlook and what the president will say this afternoon, we go to michael perrone. michael, good to see you. start with this cbo report. will it influence policy and what happens in washington and even the smallest way? >> the cbo is required to give a fictitious look forward at the budget numbers. it will be higher than projected unless other action is taken. the medicare doc fix, for example, will not go away. they have been voting in every
for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer and alcohol. this is 35 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. alison seabeck. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this morning i had meetings with mine tieral colleagues and others and in addition to my duties in the house i will have other meetings today. >> alison sea beck. >> i'm hear to speak, it right a mother in his constituency should not speak of the bedroom tax and confirm why her minister be able to offer her son, serving in the magesty's armed forces either a home or a bedroom on his return from duty? >> the reforms to housing benefit that we're putting in place, i'll very happily look at the case, as the honorable lady says. but the reforms that are put in place have a very clear principle of the heart. there are many people in private rented accommodation who do not have housing benefits and can't afford extra bedrooms and we have to get control of housing benefits. we're now spending as a country $23 billion pounds on housing benefits and we have to get that budget under control. >> rebecca harris. >> do my honorable
consumers taking a hit to take home pay to higher payroll taxes which is part of the fiscal cliff resolution. courtney reagan here on the retail beat. hi, courtney. welcome back from dallas. >> january an interesting month. it is promotional. make way for full price spring merchandise. but that means many goods sold are sold at rock bottom prices that replaces it. of the 18 drugstore retailers, thompson reuters has a gain of 5.8%, year over year. far surpassing expectations of 3.5%, thanks for a demand of winter apparel. the biggest perform group by far with comps up 11.4%. discount retailers turning in the lowest comps for the month. jc penney increasing by 11.7%. sales are driven by quote fresh fashion which would suggest nonclearance sales. but the retailer up guidance, only slightly. for specialty, 8% increase in comes doubles expectations and limiting more than double on wall street chain sales. despite the big comps, limited says it's comfortable with earnings consensus and gap remains just slightly ahead of wall street estimates. disappointing, shares are selling off. >> gap has had a
obama had to say about spending and taxes last night on cbs news before the super bowl. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue. coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way. >> so what does smart spending cuts mean? judd gregg is co-chair of the fix the debt campaign. robert reich is from the university of california at berkeley and author of "beyond outrage." both are cnbc contributors and we thank you for joining us. good to see you both. senator gregg, what's a smart spending cut? what's that mean? >> i don't know. i think it's a washington speak word for probably no cuts. >> no cuts? >> that's the tradition in washington. they say if it's not a good cut, don't make the cut. the fact is there's going to have to be decisions made here. taxes were raised at the end of the year. and we know we can't get to the fiscal responsibility we need without our entitlement accounts. they'll vo to step up. >> do you think we will actually see spending cuts on the entitlements? >> what i think is going to happ
of spending cuts and tax reforms that would delay the economically damaging effects of a sequester for fear -- few more months. lou: headed in the right direction icaria statement considering that it contracted the last quarter, and as he is fond of doing, insisted that republicans give him something for the privilege of doing his bidding. he wants more revenue. tonight we focus on the economy, congressional budget office today not happen the president. as it predicted more fiscal and economic pain for the foreseeable future. projecting another 7 million people will lose their job based health insurance because of obamacare. the cbo director says high unemployment is here to stay. >> under current law we expect that the unemployment rate will remain above seven and a half% through next year. that would make 2014 that sixth year in a row that unemployment is so high, the longest such in 70 years. lou: today president of bollinger and at least part of his focus from sequestration and control the illegal immigration. again, the president not helped when democratic congressman john conyers toda
hold us back on and in the senate a day later. but what do they do? they raised taxes, didn't cut spending, and essentially postponed some of the other issues, like the debt ceiling, which was going to come up very quickly in the new year, and now has been postponed to may 19. we also have a sequestration but was postponed for two months and that's coming back at the end of february. and if that wasn't enough we have a c.r., since we don't pass budgeting now, we governed by c.r. we have a continuing resolution debate and vote coming up on or before the 27th of march. so what we have done is we've spread these crises out over the course of the whole first half of the year and that's going to be difficult for the economy to manipulate, because as we start istartto see fundamental improvt elsewhere, we will see continued refocusing on the inability of our government to come to terms with its spending, it's taxes, and its debt and deficit. and that will continually, i believe, while markets and call into question some of the more optimistioptimisti c factors that we are seeing. i'd li
talked to all the constituencies out here in the big battles over the budget and taxes and fiscal reform, and now, today, immigration. the president meeting with about a dozen ceos. they have been coming in here. the meeting starts in about five minks. among them, the ceo of goldman sachs, coca-cola, yahoo, among the executives visiting, again, today, we've seen them before, and this strategy has worked for the president. as you know, after he met with them, a couple of times, he got them, many of them to agree to hire taxes on the wealthy, and, eventually, cut that deal to avoid the fiscal cliff with republicans by getting the top tax rates back up to 39.6% and families making more than $450,000 a year. the president continues the strategy to get the business community to his side and pressure congress to do what he wants. liz: they want to hire smart immigrants, they want, anybody, i think -- >> they do. liz: business leaders with a degree here to stay and start businesses here and not go back to china, india, or whatever country they are from. rich, to you know. what's the congression
real spenged cuts for more tax hikes. the president's sequester should be replaced with spending cuts and reforms that put us on a path to balance a budget over the next 10 years. the american people believe that the tax question has been settled. they know the president called for a balanced approach to the debt. combination of revenues and spending cuts, and they know he's gotten his revenue. the american people do not believe the president will use further tax revenues to lower the debt. and haven't seen this president attempt to spend his way into prosperity over the last four years, they know he'll spend it. the president doesn't believe we have a spending problem. he general winly believes the government -- genuinely believes the government spending causes economic growth. if that were true, the economy today would be thriving. it isn't thriving. the unemployment rate is still nearly 8% and rising. small businesses like the one i ran are struggling. middle class families, those lucky enough to have a job, are living paycheck to paycheck. and president obama just insisted on rais
? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> it hasn't sunk in yet. crazy. unbelievable. tough to put into words because it just really hasn't sunk in yet. i don't even think it's sunk in that we're here, let alone won the thing, so pretty cool. >> the way that game played out when it was 28-6 and the lights went out and whatever happened, i just knew with jim harbaugh being on the other sideline and all those years that we've been together, that that game was going to be a dogfight right to the end. that those guys were coming back. >> i just try to let my teammates at this moment know what we feel like. and last night when i had the conversation with them, you know, that just came directly from my heart to tell them what this feeling would feel like and what god has showed me and for us
. this is the biggest tax in the world but it's a small tax and one of the measures with a car seat is pro-child and objectively anti-family. >> host: what about some of the other social forces leaning in this direction? for example working women, women going to college and all those things pushing us toward a world of having a child could be more difficult for some. >> guest: it could probably be run up against biology. anything that pushes your average age of first births backwards ultimately is going to push you to have fewer children. the average age of first birth is about 28 years old, 29 years old. it used to be about 22 and part of this as we is we made college virtually required for middle-class both men and women and as you push back the age of first family formations of people can really think about getting married right out of college to 22 and april used to be married and settled and ready to begin family life. again you start pushing that horizon where you might be having children further back and this causes if you want to have a bunch of kids close together which only crazy
session which topics included state of the economy, housing benefits for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer and alcohol. this is 35 minutes. dispersed so they can go to the projects so desperately needed. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the cells i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. is it right that a mother and my contingency may not -- confirmed by his minister, her son serving in her majesty's armed forces -- [inaudible] >> the reforms to housing benefit that we're putting in place, and i'm happy to look at the case of the honorable lady says -- [shouting] >> but they have a very clear principle out of their hard. there are many people who don't have housing benefit, who cannot afford extra bedrooms, and we have to get control of housing benefits. we are now spending as the country 23 billion pounds on housing benefits and we have to get that budget under co
is determined to do. >> one of my constituents has learned that when the bedroom tax is introduced she will have 24 pounds a week to live on. she is so anxious about how she's going to manage. she is having cognitive behavior therapy. but her anxiety is totally understandable. does the prime minister agree with me that those who should be receiving the cognitive behavior therapy are the ones, namely his ministers, who think she could live on 24 pounds? >> i think the party opposite does have to address the fact that for 13 years in government they were perfectly content to have a housing benefit system for people who lived in private sector housing where there was no extra benefit for empty rooms. and i cannot understand why they count it unfair to have one rule for people who have the benefit of socializing with logan and another one for people in private sector accommodation. week after week the labour mps and the labour leader comes here of posing this benefit change, that benefit change, and everything we do to deal with the mess that they left. and then tell they can learn that they have to
exchange. third, utah will not administer the premium tax credit through our exchange. there's a number of reasons we decided why not to do that. one, we pride ourselves in utah in being fiscally prudent. and i wish washington had that same pride which they certainly don't have in being fiscally prudent. only seven states in america have a a.a.a. bond rating on wall street, which tells us a lot about utah and what else is going on in the country. given the fiscal uncertainty we see here in washington, d.c.,, much of it created by a growing mentality, doesn't seem to me and to the people of utah to be a fiscally prudent thing to do when we are already borrowing 40 cents on every dollar that we spend and in large part because of the growing entitlement mentality we have in the country. i think this becomes a very risky proposition as we go forward. i don't know how much it's going to end up it's going to cost and i don't know anybody knows how much it's going to cost us. i do know the original promise by the president was going to cost us $900 billion. today the c.b.o. estimates it has go
family budgets manage before you even take out taxes you have 4% for severally getting around? >> the average median income for families in america is about $50 $51,000. there's not a lot of extra room, especially given the fact that the economy is not growing, people aren't anticipating wage increases. it's really tough out there if you're a family of four and you're trying to make do. >> shannon: how does this have a ripple effect because it's not just, you know, us going out to fill up the gas. i mean, it's the truckers who have to deliver products and food and that kind of thing. where does it show up e elsewhe? >> it shows up in food we purchased, manufactured goods. when we go to shopping i sisters to buy children's apparel, everything gets to us through vehicles with gasoline. >> shannon: there's plenty of criticism for this particular administration that it could have done more to work on domestic energy production. when you have somebody who sits as a cabinet member who said before being nominated that somehow you have to boost the price of gasoline to the levels in e
unpaid bills of 130 million euros, plus 40 million euros for the tax office and social insurance. employees have not been paid for three months. it was a very complicated situatio >> and no solution is in sight. 11,000 people are unemployed. one of them is jose, who has gone back to how his father used to earn a living. >> there's no alternative. i used to work in construction, but that closed down here. and everywhere else, things are very bad. >> the fight for survival has brought creative ideas. just before the border to gibraltar, a group of unemployed people have opened up a parking lots. you pay as much as you want. manuel rodriguez and 40 other families live from it. >> i have no money for a year. before that, i was unemployed for five years. i need this to survive. >> at the end of his day, he brings home 20 euros. his wife does not want to be filmed. she suffers from depression. his son is still in school. his family is not the only one fearing for survival. >> the entire quarter is in a similar situation. there is no industry here, no work, nothing. it brings you to you
-run the care centers where basically your taxes pay for the government to free the day care center so you can then drop your kids off while you go to work. sort of a circular sounding system and it shows the actual effect is pretty small on fertility. for every 25% increase in the government spending on these programs there isn't a 0.6 increase on the rate in the short term so what is the difference then between france and the countries that you see the rates are much lower around 1.3 or 1.5 and the difference is cultural life think. we have places where there is a longstanding commitment to try to make family life work and the of been obsessed with all this demographic stuff right after the first world war. so it helps to take things seriously over the long haul in the demographic tide. >> host: i would like to come back to the things that countries are trying and what works and what doesn't. but let's back up a little bit and talk about the cause. what role does religion played? it seems to be an important predictor who is going to have children and who is not, but not religion in the sense
not that long ago. the companies as part of the tax reform, it didn't. that said i still think it's a decent entry point to get some of the 4.79% yield. i'd hope it goes to a better yield. keep in mind this is the big daddy of the mlps with $50 billion market capitalization. it will sell down big if another big one offers stock. it has the biggest opportunity of them right now. i believe that's bigger even than kinder morgan and more than energy transfer partners. even as etp yields 7.7%. trust me, i learned the hard way that can't make up for the price depreciation when they're as poorly run as etp was. my charitable trust sadly knows. stick with quality. it's obvious that the insiders are. who am i to say they're wrong? i hope you get a chance to buy it underneath the price of the deal. that will be a bargain. this weekend at the super bowl, everywhere i went people asked me in a low yield environment what represents the best yield right now with value? i pointedly said nothing, fixed income. you have to own master limited partners. i will tell you have it not stressed these on this show,
's they will undermine everything you do right away. it hurts the economy. remember these guys aren't paying taxes or investing in people or investing in the next iphone, they are not trying to put the super bowl on, they are criminals. when you buy something from these people your money is going to organized criminals overseas. dagen: how do you drive that message come from nfl fans? if i want to stick jersey, nike wasn't making one, i am going to go out and find it some way somehow? >> that is a great question. we work with licensees to make sure there's merchandize the fans want that are available for them at every price point. so that they are not tempted to go out and buy something from a counterfeiter. we work hard with licensees and local businesses in new orleans and elsewhere to make sure we can meet the demands. dagen: designed it to go to the game since he is in frugal in this crackdown on counterfeiters? did you get him a ticket? >> we would love to have him. dagen: i would buy a plane ticket and 5 were you. john morton and anastasia daniels on the crackdown nfl merchandise or counterf
. this is what has enabled us to cross borders to have a single currency and the euro to set up a tax on financial transactions. this is enhanced cooperation. it's open to everyone. everyone who wants to come on board. and one day perhaps we can all gather around this principle, and this year, the european parliament will have a big part to play because by means of its scrutiny it will ensure that the whole thing hangs together. i, too, want to make europe more comprehensible. i call for budget integration, tax integration, social integration. it's of there. it calls for stronger political union. because otherwise it will be too weak. in other words, we need a eurozone government. we need new financial instruments to enable us to take action on a budget for the eurozone, which links up to the budget of the european union, and all of that must be subject to the scrutiny of the european parliament, and national parliament, too. i hope that next year's european elections will be a time for a great debate on the future of europe, which will enable us to decide what policies we want to con
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